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Friday, July 21, 2017
Burka ban ‘necessary in a democratic society’ rules Europe’s top court

Burka ban ‘necessary in a democratic society’ rules Europe’s top court

'And this is one of me after we moved to Europe'

The European Court of Human Rights made a ruling that reflected the will of European people, for a change, earlier this week.

In June 2011 the Belgian government prohibited anybody from appearing in public with a ‘face masked or hidden, in whole or in part, in such a way as to be unidentifiable.’

This, of course, outlawed the wearing of crash helmets in banks, balaclavas in public areas, surgical masks, hoods and certain aspects of Islamic religious headgear such as the burka and full-face niqab.

Whilst inconvenient for bank robbers and hit men, most Belgians were happy to accept the ruling which was seen as safety orientated.

However, the religion of special privilege cried foul and insisted they have a right to import their stone-age customs into the modern European country.

Two Muslim women challenged the law claiming that it should not apply to them. Samia Belcacemi and Yamina Oussar both insisted they wore the niqab by choice and that their human rights were being infringed by the ban.

Belcacemi had continued wearing the veil for a while but stopped as a result of ‘social pressure’ and fears she that would be fined. She now wanted compensating for the time she ‘had to stay at home.’

Happily, after a long legal battle and high profile court hearing, the top court have upheld the Belgian ban by ruling that the Islamic veil is not a human or civic right and that outlawing it was ‘necessary in a democratic society.’

Violations can result in fines and up to seven days in jail.

The ECHR had already ruled on a challenge to the French law in 2014 when it also rejected arguments that the restriction breached religious freedom and individual human rights.

Oussar told the court that she had now decided to stay at home, the statement from the court said.

It is not clear if she meant in Belgium or if she planned to travel home, wherever that is, and live in a society which treats women as second class citizens, offers them no protection from the courts and insists they cover themselves up for fear of men sexually attacking them because they cannot resist a bare arm or the sight of ladies hair.

– Albert Jack


Read – Is it time to drive Islam out of Europe?

Read – The Slow Death of Europe

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